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YES! Illustration by Julie Notarianni

5 Ways

To a Long, Healthy Life

We know how the oldest people in the world live. Why not create communities that offer that to everyone?

YES! Illustration by Julie Notarianni

The average lifespan in the U.S. is about 78 years, and for the first time since the 1990s, it’s getting shorter.

Despite spending much more on health care, Americans are sicker than people in other wealthy countries, with illnesses like diabetes, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, and stroke on the rise. So are “despair deaths” from drugs, alcohol, and suicide, according to researchers, with social isolation, poverty, and addiction laying the groundwork.

A long life is not just a health issue; it’s a justice issue. The wealthiest 1 percent, according to a study reported in The Lancet medical journal, now live on average 10 to 15 years longer than the poorest 1 percent. The shock of that statistic belies some basic logic that says the length of your life should not depend on the size of your bank account.

How long should we be living? It’s true that living past 100 while remaining healthy has much to do with genetics, but what about getting close to 100? There are cultures that regularly see people healthy into their 90s, free of the many diseases associated with aging.

In 2005, Dan Buettner’s National Geographic project studied such communities and found their commonalities. His research team of doctors, anthropologists, and epidemiologists discovered five “Blue Zones,” places in the world where people live the longest: Okinawa, Japan; Sardinia, Italy; Nicoya, Costa Rica; Ikaria, Greece; and Loma Linda, California. Buettner’s book The Blue Zones: 9 Lessons for Living Longer From the People Who’ve Lived the Longest became a bestseller.

“At first, it was purely a research question,” Buettner says. “It was a way to solve a cool mystery. It took about five years for me to realize that our findings could help Americans with their health.” Now he and his team are using what they learned about healthy longevity to transform communities in this country.

“None of the people in the Blue Zones tried to live longer than everyone else on earth,” Buettner says. “It’s the way they live naturally. So rather than nag people to exercise or eat healthy, why not shape people’s environments so that health is basically mindless?”

The Blue Zones Community Project was born. It aims to reshape culture and environment in order to change individual behavior, so the changes stick. “The thing about these longevity principles,” Buettner says, “is that you have to do them for a long time. If you’re a vegan for two years and then eat burgers and fries for the rest of your life, that vegan diet won’t do much for you.” So far, Blue Zones Project initiatives have reached almost 3.5 million people in over 40 cities.

Leaving long life and good health up to individuals means economic inequality comes into play, but when longevity is a group effort, communities can use Blue Zones research to help everyone live longer and healthier. Studies show that social change begins to happen when as little as 10 percent of a population changes its thinking. This is why Blue Zones teams only need about 20 percent of the population to sign Blue Zones pledges — de-conveniencing their homes to promote more movement, starting to volunteer, joining a moai group. “I don’t advertise,” Buettner says. “Cities come to me — most recently my own, Minneapolis.”

Buettner likes to deal at the city and community level; there are typically five to 10 low-hanging fruits in terms of changes to make right away that don’t stir up political tension or cost the city a lot of money. “I’d rather go to a city council and get them to pass an ordinance limiting the number of fast food restaurants within a given area than nag people to eat healthy,” Buettner says. “I get so much more done.”

Here are five principles communities can adapt to create a culture of longevity — and justice.

1

Eat Mostly Plants

YES! Illustration by Julie Notarianni

While it is becoming more widely accepted that eating more plants is better for human health and the planet, it’s often individuals left to make diet changes. But what if the commitment to a plant-based diet were community-wide?

Beacon Food Forest, 2½ miles south of downtown Seattle, is over 5 acres of permaculture food farming, providing food access for anyone who needs it. “We want people who are not software engineers in this city to know we still care about them,” co-founder Jackie Cramer says.

Lessons from Sardinia, Italy

Sardinia, the first Blue Zone researchers identified, is a genetically and culturally isolated island in the Mediterranean with the world’s longest-lived men. The common diet is heavy on plants, legumes, and fish, with meat only occasionally. Importantly, eating is a social activity. Laughter with friends reduces stress, which in turn contributes to less heart disease, improved immune systems, and sharper cognitive function.

A large strip of seasonal vegetables lines the forest to the west, and a gravel path separates the veggies from an abundant welter of fruit trees and bushes bearing everything from goumi and goji berries to the more familiar blackberries and blueberries. Some plants are specifically for supporting native pollinators. There’s a nut grove and mushroom hut. Anyone can walk through the public part of the forest to forage.

The forest is run by volunteers — a committed core of 20–25 people plus others who can be called upon if needed for specific tasks. “We’re not strict with our volunteers,” Cramer says. “If you don’t like a project, walk away and join another team. And if you have an idea for a project, we’re totally open.” Maybe this is why Beacon Food Forest never lacks workers. The project not only introduces volunteers to food growing that respects seasonality and the ecosystem, but it connects them to their community. “I’ve never met so many people in such a short amount of time,” says volunteer Joe Sutton-Holcomb.

Food as a way to build community has been effective in this fearful political climate of the Trump administration. “We’d put signs out indicating free food,” Cramer says, “but some of the neighbors across the street wouldn’t come. So we took the food to them and found out that they weren’t visiting because they weren’t sure if they needed identification.”

2

Move Naturally

YES! Illustration by Julie Notarianni

While it is becoming more widely accepted that eating more plants is better for human health and the planet, it’s often individuals left to make diet changes. But what if the commitment to a plant-based diet were community-wide?

Beacon Food Forest, 2½ miles south of downtown Seattle, is over 5 acres of permaculture food farming, providing food access for anyone who needs it. “We want people who are not software engineers in this city to know we still care about them,” co-founder Jackie Cramer says.

Lessons from Ikaria, Greece

“The world’s longest-lived people,” the Blue Zones project says, “don’t pump iron, run marathons or join gyms. Instead, they live in environments that constantly nudge them into moving without thinking about it.” The people of the small island of Ikaria have perfected the healthy art of natural movement. The very oldest members of this community are generally poor and living in the highlands, but they are healthy. Between active days of gardening or frequent walks to friends’ houses, residents don’t have to set aside time dedicated to movement.

A large strip of seasonal vegetables lines the forest to the west, and a gravel path separates the veggies from an abundant welter of fruit trees and bushes bearing everything from goumi and goji berries to the more familiar blackberries and blueberries. Some plants are specifically for supporting native pollinators. There’s a nut grove and mushroom hut. Anyone can walk through the public part of the forest to forage.

The forest is run by volunteers — a committed core of 20–25 people plus others who can be called upon if needed for specific tasks. “We’re not strict with our volunteers,” Cramer says. “If you don’t like a project, walk away and join another team. And if you have an idea for a project, we’re totally open.” Maybe this is why Beacon Food Forest never lacks workers. The project not only introduces volunteers to food growing that respects seasonality and the ecosystem, but it connects them to their community. “I’ve never met so many people in such a short amount of time,” says volunteer Joe Sutton-Holcomb.

Food as a way to build community has been effective in this fearful political climate of the Trump administration. “We’d put signs out indicating free food,” Cramer says, “but some of the neighbors across the street wouldn’t come. So we took the food to them and found out that they weren’t visiting because they weren’t sure if they needed identification.”

3

Decrease Stress

YES! Illustration by Julie Notarianni

On an individual level, de-stressing might look like a regular yoga or mindfulness practice, spending time in nature, prayer, or journaling. While these can be beneficial, in an era where thousands of jobs are being outsourced or outdated and nearly 1 in 4 Americans says they have no one they could turn to for support, a bunch of individuals reflecting on their days or doing breath work isn’t going to be enough, even for those individuals. We are social beings; we need to reduce collective stress by supporting each other.

Lessons from Nicoya, Costa Rica

Residents of Nicoya value traditions and social connections. Nicoyan centenarians get frequent visits from neighbors. They work hard physically throughout their lives, even the oldest among them, and continue old ways that go back to the Chorotega, Indigenous people of the region, including a diet of fortified maize and beans.

Modern Western communities have become unmoored from traditions and extended social groups, and the resulting individualism may be at the root of one of the greatest modern stressors: inequality. Chuck Collins, author of Born on Third Base: A One Percenter Makes the Case for Tackling Inequality, Bringing Wealth Home, and Committing to the Common Good, suggests that solving economic inequality requires “an economy that supports working, yes, but much more time for taking care of each other, playing, and making art.”

“Disconnection is a drug; privilege isolates and anesthetizes,” Collins writes.

So how can a community de-stress together? Fight inequality. Reach outside your socio-economic sphere, befriend people in different social classes. Find common goals to work toward together: community gardening, repairing houses, improving public spaces. Organize support for those who are vulnerable in this current regime of hatred.

4

Cultivate a Sense of Purpose

YES! Illustration by Julie Notarianni

Two-thirds of Americans hate their jobs. Yet meaningful work is good for our health. Blue Zones research explains, “Knowing your purpose adds up to seven years of life expectancy.” Opportunities to change jobs can be limited by circumstances, though.

Perhaps we can get those health benefits by creating communities with a shared sense of purpose. Native cultures share a stewardship for the Earth, believing that it belongs to everyone, including future generations. Alaska has built into policy the idea that its resources do not belong to any individual exclusively, so every Alaskan resident receives a portion of oil revenue.

Lessons from Loma Linda, California

The 9,000-member Seventh-day Adventist Church makes up the core of the only Blue Zone in America. Church members create a social fabric out of helping others in the community, and the church provides many opportunities for volunteering. Giving time to others not only staves off depression, but doing so with others as part of a larger mission amplifies the benefits.

In Montana last year, the idea of opening up the state to take in refugees started with one woman but would likely not have grown into Soft Landing, the nonprofit in Missoula that welcomes and resettles refugees, had it not been for others joining her. Mary Poole was spurred by a viral picture of a dead Syrian child, and was joined by other Montana moms in creating space for refugees. “I’m not a political person. I’m not a save-the-world activist. I don’t have a TV. I didn’t know about refugees, that it was a debate,” Poole says.

She may not have started out as an activist, but she and the other Soft Landing moms who joined her have a clear sense of purpose. So far 30 refugee kids have a place in Montana schools. “Our sense of purpose is still very focused. On the simplest level, it’s how do we create a welcoming environment for refugee families in our community? More broadly, it’s how do we be a good community member as an organization and extend that welcome to everyone in a rising-tide-lifts-all-ships sort of way? So we do dialogue training, join the housing conversations that our community is having — you know, really exist within a community. We now have 30 volunteers that do one-on-one tutoring with every single English-language kid, not just refugees in our schools.” This is what happens when you get to know your surroundings: You see needs and create ways to meet them.

Human beings are social. If we tell stories of what we can do together, then everyone can draw some sense of individual purpose from the shared purpose. We will also have more stamina and inspiration for the tough battles ahead — dismantling racism, dealing with police brutality, climate change. And we might begin to combat social isolation and loneliness at the same time.

5

Belong to a Healthy Tribe

YES! Illustration by Julie Notarianni

Smoking, obesity, happiness, and even loneliness all have been shown to be contagious. So it stands to reason that the longest-lived people live in communities where most people are making healthy choices. Think of this “group mind” as positive peer pressure.

Lessons from Okinawa, Japan

Okinawa is where women live longer than anywhere else. Okinawans stay active by keeping “medical gardens” full of vegetables, herbs, and spices that they consume every day. They have ikigai, a strong sense of shared purpose. They maintain deep dedication to friends and family, with social networks, moais, groups of friends dedicated to each other for life. These tribes promise financial support in times of need, allowing for the emotional security of knowing that someone is always there for them.

But healthy tribes to surround us are largely missing in the U.S. Generations move away from each other, and a Western culture of individualism is one part of the problem. Consider that romantic relationships are valued higher than friendships. Can we reverse that? Our health and longevity would improve if we did.

How do we create a moai culture? Social philosopher Roman Krznaric suggests that one way to do this is through restoring a sense of belonging, and to do this we cultivate empathy. “There are two kinds of individualism, and there are at least two kinds of empathy,” Krznaric says.

“Individualism that pictures each human being as totally self-sufficient providing for all of his or her material, physical, and social needs is damaging and dishonest. But individualism that celebrates each human being’s unique personhood and potential contribution to the world — we’ll call that individuality — that’s good and necessary,” he says. Shifting our collective story away from rugged individualism and more toward interconnected individuality will reduce the stigma around asking for help and relieve the terrible burden of loneliness and stress if one has to make it all on one’s own.

A culture that supports, protects, and honors friendships will give everyone more opportunities to be surrounded by caring people making healthy choices. Changing our environments might be difficult, but it’s easier than changing all by ourselves.

“We’re Feeding Our Liberation”

D.C. farmers say crops and methods of their African ancestors hold an essential key to restoring Black health.

Farms in Puerto Rico

Xavier Brown visited farms in Puerto Rico to study agroecology and African food roots. Photo by Xavier Brown

One Saturday morning in November, Xavier Brown was working in the Dix Street community garden in northeast Washington, D.C. The garden is near the Clay Terrace public housing complex in the heart of the city’s Ward 7, home to about 70,000 people, 94 percent of whom are African American.

Brown worked alongside six formerly incarcerated men to build a compost bin big enough to generate 1,200 pounds of rich soil, or what they call “black gold,” out of neighborhood food scraps. The compost is an essential ingredient for growing crops in the 32 garden beds they also made from donated and recycled plywood.

Within a few hours, more bins were close to being finished, with dozens of feet of steel hardware cloth protecting the food scraps inside from rodents and other animals.

“It was not looking like this this morning,” Brown says in amazement.

Brown formed a partnership with Boe Luther and Wallace Kirby, two gardeners from Ward 7 who started Hustlaz 2 Harvesters to offer people released from incarceration ways out of poverty into urban agriculture careers and other social enterprises. Brown, a certified master composter for the city, helped Luther and Kirby transform an empty lot into the Dix Street community garden as part of an urban agricultural initiative called Soilful City.

Only 1 in 10 Americans eats the daily recommendation of fruits and vegetables, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and people living in poverty have especially low rates of consumption of fresh produce. Access to healthy produce is difficult in low-income communities like Clay Terrace, because major chain supermarkets are reluctant to locate their stores there. Ward 7 has only one large grocery store, and that means the people who live there have a harder time obtaining more fruits and vegetables to help reduce cardiovascular risk.

left double quoteBlack people need to return to being growers, builders, and producers, so when we’re consuming, we’re also feeding one another, and we’re feeding our liberation.”

Yet Brown, Luther, and Kirby believe the community can grow its way out of food scarcity through the Dix Street garden and similar projects. They say crops that were staples of their African ancestors’ diets hold an essential key to restoring the community’s health.

“It’s not just about vegetables — we’re building a new way to rebuild neighborhoods,” Brown says.

“Black people need to return to being growers, builders, and producers, so when we’re consuming, we’re also feeding one another, and we’re feeding our liberation,” he says.

For instance, to transform the food landscape in Washington, D.C., Brown, Kirby, and Luther helped a neighbor grow bodi, a long string bean indigenous to central Africa. The bean provides many nutrients that are routinely missing from most Americans’ diets, including fiber and vitamins. In Washington, it’s helping reconnect the local population to their cultural heritage.

Xavier Brown, left, helps construct a wooden compost bin

Xavier Brown, left, helps construct a wooden compost bin inside the Dix Street community garden in northeast Washington, D.C. Photo by Kevon Paynter

At the same time, the work of planting and harvesting helps build an environment and community that can facilitate healing from the traumatic legacy of land-based oppression — from slavery to more modern practices of racist covenants and housing redlining — that Black people in the United States have endured.

“This is the generation that only sees [agricultural work] as a part of plantation slavery,” Kirby says. He says the neighborhood used to be filled with garden beds and chickens, because most of the families had come from the rural South and brought their way of life with them.

A lot of that rural character was then lost, especially after the 1968 riots that tore through the city after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.

“After the riots, everyone wanted to disconnect with the Earth, with nature; they didn’t see the value,” he says. His eyes widen as he describes destroyed backyard gardens, Black businesses looted and burned. The community’s connection to land and its spirit of self-reliance broke.

Brown hopes to mend that rift by looking to African roots. He has adopted a practice called Afro-ecology, a theory and practice created by fellow urban farmer Blain Snipstal to describe how Black people in the U.S. can reconnect with their African or Afro-indigenous past through traditional planting and harvesting techniques.

“Afro-ecology is reorientation of our connection to the land, an organizing principle, and the way we express our culture while we grow food and grow healthy people,” Brown says.

Using food and farming to overcome the trauma resulting from a history of land oppression and racism is work Leah Penniman knows well. She is a farmer and food justice organizer in upstate New York at Soul Fire Farm, where hundreds of new Black, Latinx, Native American, and Asian growers come to participate in agricultural training workshops that focus on healing people as well as the land.

“We are in a moment where Black and Brown people are ready to reclaim our right to belong to the Earth and ready to reclaim our place and agency in the food system,” Penniman says.

Penniman sees delving deeply into the history of food injustice — effectively naming racism as the problem — as the first step in search of better solutions to structural realities of food injustice. At Soul Fire, Penniman discusses the hundreds of cases of Black farmers being cheated out of or driven off their land in 13 Southern and border states from the Civil War up to the 1960s.

Xavier Brown, left, helps construct a wooden compost bin

A large garden shed built using donated power tools and recycled plywood contains a food refrigerator and grilling area. Across the street from the community garden is the Clay Terrace public housing complex. Photo by Kevon Paynter

The next steps involve learning the history of African agriculture and how it was transplanted to the Americas and became intertwined with the suffering and generational trauma of slavery. She wants to transform that pain into power, allowing Black farmers to take on the role of a griot, or a traditional African storyteller.

“We’ve replaced that story with a different story of ‘ I’m harvesting a plant that’s sacred to my people and I’m harvesting a crop that will benefit my community in these particular ways,’” she says. “So, we are ‘ deprogramming’ the victim mindset, the reactive mindset, and instead connecting with our ancestral way of being [on the land], which is a proactive mindset with agency and power.”

Similarly, Soilful City’s project connects recently released inmates and other community members of Clay Terrace to planting and harvesting methods rooted in the African diaspora, and their collective work authors a new story of self-determination and healthy food access for the neighborhood. At the same time, the farm is helping people develop work skills and producing needed revenue in the community, while also providing other urban agriculture businesses, like the legal marijuana industry, with composting and high-yield soil.

“I believe we can dominate the composting landscape in D.C. and have a model to take elsewhere,” Brown says.

If the rates of obesity, diabetes, and lower life expectancy in the neighborhood are reduced as a result, that will be just one more sign of the success the project is having in the community in repairing the broken relationship between the urban population and the land.

Another sign of hope is the vibrant red fish peppers growing in the garden beds, a crop originally from the Caribbean that nearly died out before it was salvaged by Horace Pippin, a painter who saved many rare seeds used by fellow Black gardeners in the 1940s.

By growing fish peppers, Brown says, he’s paying his respects to a fellow African American farmer.

Brown and Winford James, one of the men building the compost bin, started a micro-enterprise to bring a sweet and spicy hot sauce recipe they make from the fish pepper to market. Soilful City is changing communities, James says.

“Every farm I’ve ever been to has been with Xavier,” he says. “By helping them help the community, I’m also helping myself.”

Kevon Paynter
People We Love

Podcasting the Revolution

Brian Jost, right, and Andre Koen

Brian Jost, a White person trying to learn about race, and Andre Koen, a Black diversity trainer, turned their conversations into the podcast “Armchair Activist.”Photo from Lillie Suburban Newspapers

You want to act against injustice, but you don’t know how? You think nonstop, one-sided political commentary seems to hurt more than it helps? A few podcasters are sharing a different perspective on the activism around us. And with compassion, practical tools, and a little millennial humor, they’re encouraging us to engage.

Sherri Mitchell and Rivera Sun
Sherri Mitchell & Rivera Sun “Love (and Revolution) Radio”

The news rarely shows how movements like NoDAPL and Black Lives Matter are built on love and non-violent activism. Sherri Mitchell and Rivera Sun want to bolster that narrative.

Mitchell, a Penobscot author and Indigenous rights attorney, and Sun, a White novelist and activist, are co-hosts of a podcast called “Love (and Revolution) Radio.” They report from the front lines of social justice movements, covering resistance to oil pipelines, police brutality, mass incarceration, drone warfare, nuclear proliferation — all with a mix of activism and spirituality.

“We wanted to inspire people, to help them to recognize that they are not powerless, by sharing stories of individuals who are actually involved in heart-based change,” Sun says.

Sun and Mitchell’s friendship sparks hope: They both grew up in Maine, but Sun was completely unaware there was an impoverished reservation just 100 miles away where Mitchell lived. Compassion helped them learn from each other.

“When we start thinking about the work we’re doing out in the world, we need to be guided by wisdom,” Mitchell says. “That wisdom comes from our hearts.”

Roqayah Chamseddine and Kumars Salehi
Roqayah Chamseddine & Kumars Salehi “Delete Your Account”

Roqayah Chamseddine, a Lebanese-American writer based in Sydney, Australia, and Kumars Salehi, a California Ph.D. student and self-described “total nerd,” met on Twitter around the time Bernie Sanders lost the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination. As Hillary Clinton and the mainstream Democrats took center stage in the general election, Chamseddine and Salehi saw a need for providing strong voices on the radical Left that inspire action — and are also fun to listen to.

That’s when they started “Delete Your Account,” a left-wing podcast that they co-host with a dose of millennial humor. They discuss activism and organizing around urgent problems — the Rohingya genocide in Myanmar, the Palestinian freedom movement, organizing in the workplace, sexual violence. Guests on the show tend not to be heady analysts, but people working for change.

“We try to talk to activists and people that are doing on-the-ground work, because we think that actually helps give people the tools they need — if they’re listeners and they want to get involved — to identify problems in their environment and in their community, and actually take practical steps toward ameliorating them,” Salehi says.

Andre Koen and Brian Jost
Andre Koen & Brian Jost “Armchair Activist”

Brian Jost lives in St. Anthony, Minnesota — the suburb patrolled by Officer Jeronimo Yanez, who killed Philando Castile in 2016. As yard signs for both Black and Blue Lives Matter sprang up in the neighborhood, Andre Koen, a Black diversity trainer, and Jost, a White person trying to learn about race, turned their conversations into a podcast.

In “Armchair Activist,” they explore race and police brutality in the Twin Cities, avoiding shame, blame, and guilt. Koen’s guests have included an outspoken Black activist and the St. Paul police chief, as well as a state legislator who proposed a bill allowing police to fine protestors.

“We’ve lost that ability, or the desire, to actually engage in conversations with people who differ from us, when in the past that was an invitation for friendship,” says Koen, whose father, a Black Panther-turned-Pentecostal-preacher, taught him to pursue social justice.

“I get frustrated,” he says. “I get, sometimes, confused as to why things aren’t moving at the pace that I think they should. But at the end of the day, I have to recognize that I have to speak up.”

The Page That Counts

The Numbers That Define Our World

Total square miles burned by wildfires in the U.S. in 2017, as of Dec. 2014,918 1

Rank, in terms of destruction, of 2017 wildfires in California’s recorded history1 2

Number of major hurricanes (Category 3 or higher) in 20176 3

Rank of the 2017 hurricane season in economic losses1 4

Total inches of rain that fell on Nederland, Texas, as a result of Hurricane Harvey60.58 5

Rank of Hurricane Harvey rainfall total among hurricane data dating to 19501

Number of ballistic missiles launched by North Korea in 201724 6

Rank of 2017 among years with most missile launches by North Korea1

Number of bills signed by President Donald Trump in 201796 7

Rank of President Trump among 10 predecessors in number of bills signed during the first 100 days in office (Not including Ford and Johnson, whose terms did not begin with the start of a new Congress)1 8

During his first year in office10

Estimated minimum number of airstrikes a U.S.-led coalition has conducted to expel ISIS from Iraq and Syria27,500 9

Total number of Iraqi civilian deaths as a result of airstrikes since 2014, according to an independent tally of the coalition’s incident summaries 466

Factor by which it found the coalition’s reports underestimated civilian deaths per airstrike31

Total number of deaths as a result of gun violence, not including suicides, in the U.S. in 201715,587 10

Expected rate of gun-related deaths per 100,000 people in the U.S. if socioeconomic status were the sole contributing factor0.79 11

Actual rate of U.S. gun-related deaths per 100,000 people3.85

Square footage of Amazon’s first major Seattle headquarters established in 1998190,000 12

Square footage of Amazon’s Seattle-area footprint as of 201713.6 million

Price of Bitcoin on Feb. 7, 2011$1.01 USD 13

Price of Bitcoin on Dec. 16, 2017$19,343.04 USD

Number of U.S. households that could be powered for one day by electricity consumed for a single Bitcoin transaction, as of Jan. 30, 201816.73 14

Total miles the Cassini spacecraft traveled since its launch on Oct. 15, 19974.9 billion 15

Gigabytes of scientific data the spacecraft collected635

Number of images taken453,048

Number of science papers published as a result of its data3,948

Spacecraft speed, in miles per hour, at loss of signal on Sept. 15, 201769,368

Total cost of the Cassini-Huygens mission$3.9 billion

Gross worldwide revenue earned by Star Wars: The Last Jedi in 2017$1.3 billion 16

1. National Interagency Fire Center 2. California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection 3. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 4. Ball State University 5. NOAA Weather Prediction Center 6. Bloomberg 7. GovTrack 8. GovTrack Insider 9. New York Times 10. Gun Violence Archive 11. Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation/National Public Radio 12. BuildZoom 13. CoinDesk Inc. 14. Digiconomist 15. National Aeronautics and Space Administration 16. Box Office Mojo

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